Tutorials

Tutorials will be organized on November 9, 2015. The registration is mandatory but free of charge for individuals having a registration to IECON 2015.

Tutorial Program *Tutorials are subject to change or cancel without notice.

  Title of Tutorial
(click link to view abstract)
Speaker Affiliation of speaker Time
T01 Advanced Current-fed Power Converters: Snubberless and Naturally Clamped Akshay Kumar Rathore National University of Singapore Nov. 9
13:20
|
15:20
T03 State-of-the-Art Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Control Methods in Automotive Traction Applications Considering Thermal Influences Wilhem Peters
Oliver Wallscheid
Joachim Böcker
University Paderborn
T05 Control of Grid Connected Power Converters: Methodology, Modelling and Real-Time Simulation Daniel Siemaszko Power Electronics and Systems Consultancy
T07 Smart and Precision Motion Control Technologies Michael Ruderman
Francesco Biral
Kenta Seki
Tomoyuki Shimono
University of Agder
University of Trento
Nagoya Institute of Technology
Yokohama National University
T09 Force Control Applications Toshiyuki Murakami
Kiyoshi Ohishi
Yasutaka Fujimoto
Seiichiro Katsura
Peter Xu
Keio University
Nagaoka University of Technology
Yokohama National University
Keio University
The Universtity of Auckland
T11 Matrix Converters Marco Rivera
Johann W. Kolar
José Rodríguez
Patrick Wheeler
Universidad de Talca
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
Universidad Técnica Federico
University of Nottingham
T13 Advanced Signal Processing Techniques for Condition Monitoring of Electric Machines and Drives Mohamed Benbouzid University of Brest
T15 Industrial Biomedical Development: Trends, Techniques and Applications Wing-Kuen Ling
Kim-Fung Tsang
Guangdong University of Technology
City University of Hong Kong
T04 Non-Traditional Supercapacitor assisted Circuit Topologies For Traditional Circuit Issues Nihal Kularatna The University of Waikato Nov. 9
15:40
|
17:40
T06 The emergence of Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems based on SOA and Cloud Technologies: Realising the Internet-of-Automation-Things Armando W. Colombo
Stamatis Karnouskos
University of Emden
SAP
T08 Resonant Power Converters: Topologies, Control Techniques and Applications Maria Teresa Outeiro
Giuseppe Buja
University of Porto
University of Padova
T10 New Trends in Battery Management System Design Federico Baronti
Mo-Yuen Chow
Martin Wenger
University of Pisa
North Carolina State University
Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology (IISB)
T12 Canceled    
T14 Recent Advances and Future Trends on Multilevel Converters Leopoldo G. Franquelo
Sergio Vazquez
Universidad de Sevilla

T01

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Current-fed converters are suitable for low voltage high current applications. Current-fed converters In addition, inductor is reliable compared to electrolytic capacitor along with higher lifetime (relatively reduced degradation). Alternative energy sources output (solar PV, fuel cells) is low voltage and the same is true for storage. Current-fed transformerless converters are able to boost 10x. In addition, the variability of renewables varies voltage and current (so the power) output. Therefore, the power electronics interface should accommodate such variations with high performance over entire operating range. The major challenge is maintain high efficiency with intermittent variability, load profile, and usage. Current-fed converters are superior in performance for such conditions and specifications. The major challenge in current-fed is high voltage spike/overshoot across the semiconductor devices at turn-off owing to hard commutation. It needs additional snubber circuits reducing density as well as boost capacity. In addition, the clamped device voltage is generally higher than desired. It limits the design flexibility and demands for high voltage devices resulting into higher conduction losses. We propose a novel modulation technique that achieves soft-commutation and natural voltage clamping of the devices without external snubber circuit making it snubberless while preserving the boost capacity. It solves the traditional problem of current-fed converters. The proposed modulation has been implemented and successfully demonstrated over several current-fed topologies to achieve the similar desired results. Proposed modulation permits the converters to operate under synchronous rectifier mode to improve the efficiency. Soft-switching of all semiconductor devices is achieved and maintained over wide variation in source voltage and power. Similarly, the attributes of natural device voltage clamping and soft-commutation are also maintained. The device voltage is independent of duty cycle but is clamped at reflected output voltage and can be varied by transformer turns ratio. It permits the flexibility in design and then selection of semiconductor devices to result into least conduction losses to develop an optimal high efficiency converter. Conventional current-fed as well as voltage-fed PWM and resonant converters have soft-switching limitations and lose at light load and increased source voltage. Therefore, it is quite obvious that these converters cannot maintain for entire operating range of solar panel, fuel cells, batteries, etc. However, the proposed current-fed converters maintain their originality owing to proposed modulation. Soft-switching, natural voltage clamping, and soft-switching are inherent and maintained with wide variation in source voltage and output power. Once designed at minimum voltage and maximum power condition, it maintains the given attributes guaranteed without additional auxiliary transition circuit or resonant tank. As additional measures, proposed topologies report negligible circulating current that results in higher efficiency at partial load and increased source voltage, reduced peak current stress across the components and requires low kVA rating devices and magnetics. High performance has been demonstrated compared to conventional voltage-fed resonant and PWM, and hard-commutated current-fed converters with active-clamping or snubbers. Major applications include interfacing low voltage dc and high voltage dc grids in a microgrid, MPPT, renewable energy integration, energy storage, and electric transportation.

Biography of speaker:

Dr. Akshay K. Rathore (Senior Member, IEEE) is an Assistant Professor at National University of Singapore since 2010. He received his PhD from University of Victoria, BC, Canada and had two subsequent postdoctoral appointments with University of Wuppertal, Germany, and University of Illinois at Chicago, USA. He has been working on analysis, design, and development of high-density soft-switching power electronics systems, in particular, current-fed topologies for renewables, distributed generation, microgrid, and transportation applications. He has successfully designed and developed several current-fed topologies in his lab and has demonstrated high performance. Presently, he invented a novel and innovative modulation technique to achieve zero current commutation and natural device voltage clamping of current-fed converters. Dr. Rathore is a recipient of 2013 IEEE IAS Andrew W. Smith Outstanding Young Member Award (first working in Asia to receive this award) and 2014 Isao Takahashi Power Electronics Award. He has published over 100 papers on International Conferences and Journals including 35 IEEE Transactions and has 1 patent. He successfully delivered tutorials and keynotes in International Conferences in Asia. He is vice-chair of IES Technical Committee on Electric Transportation. He has edited 3 special issues on electric transportation.

Brief description of the intended audience:

The topic of this tutorial has wide applications including UPS, vehicles (HEV/EV/FCV), fuel cell inverters, solar PV inverters, solar to battery chargers, and DC grid. Current-fed converters are picking-up for such applications as well as medium voltage multilevel applications. This tutorial will benefit audience from such industries which has wide scope as well as academic researchers planning to conduct research n this area. Since research area of microgrid, renewables, and transportation is quite hot, this tutorial will offer knowledge to new researchers willing to pursue research in power electronics for these applications.

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T03

Brief Description of Tutorials:

The operating characteristics of permanent magnet synchronous motors designed for the application in automotive traction drives are considerably different compared to the ones of industrial drives. The main characteristics are high magnetic saturation, high electrical fundamental frequencies with respect to the converter switching frequency, a wide constant-power operation range and a nonlinear reluctance torque. For the current controller design a suitable discrete-time motor model is required considering the impact of saturation and cross-saturation effects and a small number of sampling instants per electrical fundamental period. Furthermore, the motor model needs to describe the interaction between the discrete-time controller operation and the nonlinear magnetic motor characteristics. Based on that model deviation, a field-oriented current controller with a suitable decoupling of the current components can be designed. Two controller design variants will be presented: a current controller with constant parameters, that is robust to varying plant time constants due to saturation effects, and the design of an adaptive controller, which parameters are updated using a simplified saturation characteristic model. It will be shown by measurement results that the adaptive controller has a better reference response and disturbance reaction in operation points with low magnetic saturation.

To ensure a high efficiency, an operation point selection that provides appropriate current reference values with respect to the demanded torque is required. This torque control has to be realised in an open-loop manner, since power and torque measurements are not available in automotive applications. Here, a state-of-the-art ME (Maximum Efficiency) operation strategy will be compared to classical MTPC (Maximum Torque per Current) approaches. The impact of the loss characteristics of a given motor, the restrictions due to current and voltage limits and the relevance of different operation points with respect to a specific driving cycle will be discussed. Additionally, a superimposed voltage controller taking varying DC-voltages and parameter uncertainties into account will be presented. This additional controller is required to ensure maximum voltage utilisation beyond base speed while guaranteeing the viability of the inner current control loop by providing a voltage reserve margin.

Highly dynamic and stochastically load profiles in automotive applications are making it almost impossible to estimate the temperature characteristics regarding critical motor components, e.g. the stator winding or the permanent magnets, during the drive design phase. Measuring these temperatures is costly and thermal sensors are potential error sources leading to enormous repair efforts in the failure case. Against this background, real-time capable methods to observe critical motor temperatures have to be considered within the motor control software. A suitable temperature estimation will be the basis for a derating controller that is required to prevent device failures due to thermal stress while utilising a given motor to a maximum thermal extent. In addition, certain electrical motor model parameters are temperature sensitive and adapting these within the control software leads to an increased control performance and accuracy.

Biography of speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Wilhem Peters
Wilhelm Peters (M'2015) is a postdoctoral fellow and team leader at the Department of Power Electronics and Electrical Drives at Paderborn University. He received his diploma and doctor's degrees (with honours) in electrical engineering from the Paderborn University in 2008 and 2015, respectively. His current research work is on control methods for electrical drives in automotive traction applications focusing on discrete-time motor model considering magnetic saturation and loss-optimal operation.

M.Sc. Oliver Wallscheid
Oliver Wallscheid (M'2013) is a research assistant and Ph.D.-student at the Department of Power Electronics and Electrical Drives at Paderborn University. He received his bachelor and master degrees (with honours) in industrial engineering from Paderborn University in 2010 and 2012, respectively. In his current Ph.D.-project he is investigating real-time capable methods to observe critical motor component temperatures in automotive traction drive applications.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Joachim Böcker
Joachim Böcker (M'2004–SM'2008) is full professor and head of the Department of Power Electronics and Electrical Drives at the Paderborn University, Germany. He studied electrical engineering at Berlin University of Technology, Germany, where he received the Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing. degrees in 1982 and 1988, respectively. He was with AEG and DaimlerChrysler research as head of the control engineering team of the electrical drive systems laboratory from 1988 to 2001. In 2001, he started his own business in the area of control engineering, electrical drives and power electronics. In 2003, he was appointed to the current professorship. An important research focus of the past years were control and thermal modelling of automotive electrical drives.

Brief description of the intended audience:

The tutorial attendees should be familiar with:
 • Basics of electric motor modelling
 • Basics of control theory

The tutorial authors expect a strong demand on the proposed topic since the world-wide trend to electric and hybrid-electric vehicles (EV/HEV) is more and more consolidating. As the electrical drive system is one of the most important parts in EV/HEV relating control methods are relevant to a brought potential audience, e.g.:
 • Master and Ph.D.-students as well as junior research scientists from the described field
 • Industrial engineers from the automotive sector or related sectors
 • Senior research scientists from other fields interested in the topic and its challenging aspects

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T04

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Energy efficiency in DC-DC converters, protection of electronic circuits against short duration high voltage transients, rapid energy transfer at high power into a fluid flowing through a pipe and increasing the power density of inverters could be identified as some traditional problems is electrical engineering. Non-traditional supercapacitor assisted circuit topologies were developed as unique circuit solutions to these traditional problems.

Commercial supercapacitors are available from fractional farads to over 5000F as low-voltage single-cells, and, in module form for voltage ratings over 100V today. These devices have high power density compared to batteries due to their relatively constant and very low equivalent series resistance, but their energy density is one order lower than rechargeable chemistries. Traditional applications of these devices are in battery-supercapacitor hybrids used in UPS and power quality enhancers, wind energy systems, hybrid electric vehicles, portable devices and in powering memories.

First 30 minutes of the tutorial will provide an overview of commercial supercapacitor families and their capabilities and limitations, comparing them with rechargeable battery chemistries including a short practical demonstration on the capability of a 3000 F order single cell device.

In the second 90 minutes of the tutorial, an introduction to patented or patent pending new circuit topologies such as (i) supercapacitor assisted low dropout regulators (SCALDO) (ii) supercapacitor assisted surge absorbers (SCASA) (iii) supercapacitor assisted temperature modification apparatus (SCATMA) and (iv) supercapacitor assisted high density inverter (SCAHDI) will be presented. Required characterisation of these supercapacitors for these new applications will be included.

SCALDO is a technique where a SC is used as theoretically lossless voltage dropper in the series path of a LDO where energy recirculation happens at a very low frequency range of mili-hertz to fractional hertz, eliminating the RFI/EMI issues. It is not a variation of charge pumps and the technique's capability is identified by a efficiency multiplication factor. For a 12-5V case this factor is 2 and for 5 to 1.5 V and 5 to 3.3V it is 3 and 1.33 respectively.

SCASA is a short-term high-voltage transient-surge absorption technique based on a SC based sub-circuit absorbing part of the transient energy in surge protector. This is capable of minimizing the components required in a surge protector circuit.

SCATMA is a technique developed to fast-heat the water flowing into the water faucets in domestic situations to avoid the waste of water due to long buried pipes in walls. This can save huge amount of daily wasted water due to delays in hot-water supply.

SCAHDI is a supercapacitor assisted technique for improving the power density of inverters usable in renewable energy applications, where the fundamental energy loss associated with the charging of an (partial or fully) empty capacitor using a voltage source. This technique is expected to assist reducing the input ripple current in an inverter.
All these SC assisted techniques are outputs of a unique research program on-going at the University of Waikato under the leadership of the sole presenter, and most of these works are covered by issued or pending patents. Presented work is also covered by many IEEE/ IET publications within the period of 2009 to 2015.

Biography of speaker:

Nihal Kularatna won the New Zealand Engineering Innovator of the Year 2013, for his research and commercially oriented work on supercapacitor applications. His eighth book was published under the title Energy Storage Devices for Electronic Systems- Rechargeable batteries and Supercapacitors by Elsevier-Academic Press, USA in 2015, as a research monograph on his work on energy storage devices. He has published over 110 papers, and he is currently research-active in non-traditional supercapacitor applications, and, power management systems. He has developed several new supercapacitor (SC) applications such as SC assisted low dropout regulators (SCALDO), SC assisted surge absorbers (SCASA) and SC assisted temperature modification apparatus (SCATMA), which have culminated US or PCT patents and pending patents in addition to many IEEE publications. He is currently working on several new SC assisted techniques such as SC assisted high density inverter (SCAHDI) and SC assisted brake energy recovery (SCABER).
He graduated in 1976, spent 10 years as a professional electronics engineer in aviation and telecommunications managing large systems, and moved into industrial research at the Arthur C Clarke Institute for Modern Technologies (ACCIMT) in Sri Lanka in 1985 as an R& D engineer. After ten year period as a principal research engineer, he was appointed as the chief executive officer of the ACCIMT in 1999. During his 16+ years at the ACCIMT he was responsible for many successful industrial R &D projects and many industry oriented CPD courses. His broad industrial exposure together with long research expertise has allowed him to author eight books: two consecutive volumes of books for IET Electrical Measurement Series (Vol 10-1996 and Vol 11-2003/2008); two design references for CRC Press, USA (2008/2012); and, and three books on circuit design, power electronics and energy storage devices for Elsevier, USA. After his move to New Zealand in 2002 he was a senior lecturer at the University of Auckland and in 2006 he moved to the University of Waikato as a senior lecturer. He is a Fellow of IET, Fellow of Institute of Professional Engineers, NZ and a Senior Member of IEEE.

Brief description of the intended audience:

Expected knowledge from the audience is basic electrical engineering only. Tutorial is to provide an overview of how supercapacitors are capable of solving several unique and well-known issues in power electronic circuits. The tutorial will assist post graduate students as well as academics, in addition to practicing engineers.

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T05

Brief Description of Tutorials:

This tutorial is aiming to give both intuitive and practical understanding on the issues related to the control of power converter connected to any kind of grids in a general context of multiplication of decentralized power generation and microgrids. A special focus will be provided on the control of power converters connected to weak or isolated networks with a particular attention to synchronisation and harmonic rejection. The implementation of a dedicated control on the power converter side together with a careful identification of network perturbations will be supported by both theory and practical examples.
The covered topics will include network basics (grid modelling, strength, harmonic distortion and standards), control of power converters (control basics, handling of AC systems), grid synchronisation (PLL techniques, handling of weak networks with disturbances) and handling of asymmetric grids (control techniques for decoupling disturbances). The tutorial will contain design and simulation examples supported by industrial experience and academic approach. A Hardware in the Loop Real-Time simulator brought by the lecturer will demonstrate all mentioned topics and developments with live running examples and an implemented controller.
This tutorial addresses to a general audience willing to know more about issues encountered in the handling of weak and asymmetric networks from the point of view of the power converter as well as the use of a real-time simulator for interacting a power converter with a network. Elements of control theory and practical examples are given so anyone can follow and understand the theoretical developments. Not restraining to general knowledge, control specialists will also find their interest as developments will be pushed further with proper theoretical demonstrations and practical implementation.

Biography of speaker:

Daniel Siemaszko (S'08-M'09) was born in Fribourg, Switzerland, in 1982. He received the M.Sc. degree from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland, in 2005, and the Ph.D. degree from the same institute (EPFL) at the Industrial Electronics Laboratory in 2009. His Ph.D. study was focused on self-switching devices.
During his Ph.D., he also contributed in the European project UNIFLEX-PM for which he studied a medium frequency isolation module for a multilevel converter aiming for micro-grid interconnection. After his thesis, he joined the Electrical Machine and Power Electronics Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden, as a Postdoctoral Researcher, where he worked on the implementation of a modular multilevel converter. Then, he joined the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland, in the Electronic Power Converter group (EPC), working on the powering strategies of a future accelerator as well as the implementation of modular resonant converters for high voltage DC/DC converters. He worked some time with ABB MV-Drives, Turgi, Switzerland, on the control of active rectifiers and drives connected to weak asymmetric networks for which he filed two patents. He works now in collaboration with Swiss universities, as a teaching assistant.
With about 10 years experience in power electronics and systems, as a development engineer in industry and applied researcher in university, he founded PESC-CH in 2014. His strong technical skills and wide expertise reflects on the numerous targets and activities of the consulting company. His interests range from control of power converters to implementation of modular topologies and their integration into several power systems including renewable energy sources.

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T06

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) refer to ICT systems (sensing, actuating, computing, communication, etc.) embedded in physical objects, interconnected through several networks including the Internet, and providing citizens and businesses with a wide range of innovative applications based on digitalized data, information and services. We are witnessing today several concepts and technology trends when designing and implementing solutions on Industry Cyber-Physical Infrastructures e.g., the Internet-of-Things, the SmartGrid, the Factory of the Future, the Industry 4.0, etc. Especially when key issues on cross-layer collaboration, (near) real-time interaction, complexity and emergency behaviour management, support of system of systems evolvability, heterogeneity, interoperability, scalability etc. are coming into play, we have to radically rethink engineering approaches under the requirements and constraints of the Industrial Systems. Structural Integration and Behavioural Collaboration are major goals especially for a domain relative new to IT technologies and their rapid evolution pace. A digitalization of the industrial environment based on Service-oriented Architectures (SoA), Web and Cloud Computing Technologies, among others, have been proven to be a real and feasible innovation backbone at Internet scale, and are finding their way in the future Industrial Systems, allowing the realization of the Internet-of-Automation-Things.

Based on Lessons learned from latest prototype industrial applications, we need to further evaluate and assess the capability and applicability of the implemented approaches, and ask for scientific, technological and also social key questions e.g., how deep can we go with web technologies in real-time monitoring and control; how can we realize the next generation large-scale distributed monitoring systems; how to support the lifecycle of industrial solutions viewed under the system of systems engineering viewpoint; how to architect the next generation distributed automation and management systems; what is the trade-off for security, trust and privacy; how can we migrate towards digitalized smart industrial collaborative systems; how to design today the best legacy system of tomorrow; how to support the integration into and the interaction of the human with the digitalized industrial world (the machine operator, the line supervisor, the system maintenance, the planner, the production manager, are also digitalized “THINGS"), etc.

The tutorial aims at providing an insight to aspects such as: major industrial requirements and challenges to innovate in designing, implementing, deploying and operating ICPS; which Information-Communication-Automation paradigms and associated technologies are supporting those innovations? e.g. web services on devices, integration with enterprise systems (MES/ERP), collaborative service- and agent-based automation, future cloud-based SCADA/DCS, engineering large scale digitalized industrial systems of systems, migration of legacy industrial infrastructures, etc. We aim to strike the balance in providing lessons learned, hands-on experiences as well as future directions, aspects of interest and challenges.

Biography of speaker:

Armando Walter Colombo is Edison Level 2 Group Senior Expert and Research and Innovation Program Manager at Schneider Electric. He also director of the Institute for Industrial Informatics, Automation and Robotics (I2AR) and professor at the University of Applied Sciences Emden-Leer, Germany. He received the Doctor degree in Engineering from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, in 1998. From 1999 to 2000 was Adjunct Professor in the Group of Robotic Systems and CIM, Faculty of Technical Sciences, New University of Lisbon, Portugal. He has extensive experience in managing multicultural research teams in multi-regional projects, participating in leading positions in several international research and innovation projects like the EU FP6 NoE IPROMS (www.iproms.org, 2004-2009), the EU FP6 Integrated Project “SOCRADES" (www.socrades.eu, 2006-2009), the EU FP7 IP IMC-AESOP (www.imc.aesop.eu, 2010-2013). Prof. Colombo is IEEE Senior member, member of the IEEE IES Administrative Committee (AdCom) and the Chair of the IEEE IES Technical Committee on Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems (2015-2016). Prof. Colombo is actively involved in several consultations at European Commission and German level dealing with Industrie4.0, Cyber-Physical Systems, System of Systems, Internet of Things. He is listed in Who's Who in the World /Engineering 99-00/01 and in Outstanding People of the XX Century (Bibliographic Centre Cambridge, UK). Prof. Colombo has over 200 publications and 30 industrial patent applications in scientific and technical areas related to the tutorial's thematic
(http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=csLRR18AAAAJ).

Stamatis Karnouskos is with SAP as a Research Expert on Internet of Things. He investigates the added-value of integrating networked embedded devices in enterprise systems. For more than 17 years Stamatis leads efforts in several European Commission and industry funded projects related to industrial automation, smart grids, Internet-based services and architectures, software agents, mobile commerce, security and mobility. Stamatis is actively involved in several consultations at European Commission and German level dealing with Cyber-Physical Systems, System of Systems, Internet of Things, energy efficiency and SmartGrids. He has acted as guest editor in IEEE/Elsevier journals, and participates as a program member committee and reviewer in several international journals, conferences and workshops. Stamatis has published over 150 technical papers and several books, including "Industrial Cloud-based Cyber-Physical Systems: The IMC-AESOP Approach" (Springer, 2014), "From Machine-to-Machine to the Internet of Things: Introduction to a New Age of Intelligence" (Elsevier, 2014), and "Industrial Agents: Emerging Applications of Software Agents in Industry" (Elsevier, 2015).

Brief description of the intended audience:

The intended audience targets both academia and industry. From the academic side, graduate students, researchers, and interested parties would benefit from a deeper and application-oriented view on future digitalized industrial systems, emerging cyber-physical technologies and visions for realizing the Internet-of-Automation-Things. From the industry side, industrialists and practitioners would get a glimpse of existing industry efforts, innovative future directions and applicability of ICPS in the years to come.
The IECON´15 topics of interest, linked to the tutorial, are: Mechatronics, Robotics & System Integration; Electronic System on Chip & Real Time Embedded Control; Signal and Image Processing & Computational Intelligence; Factory Automation & Industrial Informatics; Information Processing & Its Applications; Information Communication Technology Based Transportation Systems.

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T07

Brief Description of Tutorials:

This tutorial covers basics, theories, and applications of motion control technologies, and is organized by four talks below.
The first talk entitled "Control of Smart Material Actuators with Hysteresis" is given by Dr. Ruderman. Smart materials, also known as active or functional materials, exhibit in general a mechanical response when being subject to an acting external field like mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, optical, etc. It is known that an accurate control of smart material systems often showing nonlinearities, hysteresis, and creep effects, among others, requires an advanced modeling and related control design. The presentation contains several aspects of hysteresis modeling in context of the overall system dynamics, model-based and model-free control design, and adaptive extensions to cope with a time-varying smart material behavior. Experimental examples from the piezoelectric and magnetic shape memory based actuators will be shown along with discussion.
The second talk is “Optimal Control Applications in Vehicle Dynamics” that will be presented by Prof. Biral. In this talk, the general theory and the numerical implementation methods and issues of the Pontryagin Minimum Principle (PMP) are introduced and discussed with examples in the automotive fields. Recent advances in theory, algorithms and computational power make it possible to solve complex practical optimal control problems both for off-line and on-line applications. The talk focuses on an Indirect Method based on the Pontryagin Minimum Principle (PMP), and presents a detailed procedure and software tools, and finally numerically solve several optimal control problems of practical relevance. Application examples will be presented and discussed for energy management of a vehicle with hybrid propulsion system, obstacle avoidance and minimum time manoeuvring.
The third talk focuses on vibration control of motion control systems and its application to high-precision positioning systems, and is presented by Prof. Seki. Fast and high precision positioning is one of indispensable techniques in a wide variety of high performance mechatronic systems from the viewpoints of high productivity, high quality of products, total cost reduction, etc. Since most of mechanisms inherently include mechanical vibration modes, the resonant vibration due to the modes prevent the control performance. In this presentation, we will discuss the vibration suppression approaches in feedback and feedforward controller design. Some approaches and experimental results will be shown by using a typical positioning device for galvano scanner in laser drilling machines.
The fourth talk is entitled “Development of Medical and Rehabilitation Robots based on Haptic Motion Control Technology”, and is presented by Prof. Shimono. In this talk, applications of haptic motion control technology to medical and rehabilitation robots are discussed. Haptic feedback function is quite important not only for performance improvement, but also for evaluation of human motion based on force information. This talk introduces some results on new medical robots, clinical test by robotic rehabilitation, and so on. Additionally, future prospects of development of new medical and rehabilitation robots based on new actuation techniques will be presented.
This tutorial is supported by Technical Committee on Motion Control in IEEE Industrial Electronics Society (IES).

Biography of speaker:

Michael Ruderman received the B.Sc. degree in applied physics from the Polytechnical University of Kharkov, Ukraine, in 1997 and the Dipl.-Inf. degree in computer and electrical engineering and the Dr.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering from the Technical University (TU) Dortmund, Germany, in 2005 and 2012, respectively. During 2006–2013, he was a Research Associate with the Institute of Control Theory and Systems Engineering, TU Dortmund. In 2013–2015, he was with Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, where he was a specially appointed Assistant Professor. From April to September 2015, he has been with Nagaoka University of Technology as Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, before joining University of Agder, Norway, from October 2015. His research interests include precise motion control, nonlinear systems with memory, flexible robots, and smart material actuators. He contributed as a member of Technical Committees for several IEEE IES conferences and served as a Publication Co-Chair for IEEE ICM2015 conference. He is a member of the Technical Committee on Motion Control and the Technical Committee on Sensors and Actuators of the IEEE IES. He is also an Associate Editor of IFAC Mechatronics journal.

Francesco Biral was born in Italy, on February 2, 1972. In 1997 he received the Master Degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Padova, Italy, and the Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics from University of Brescia, Italy, in 2000. He is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Industrial Engineering at University of Trento. His research interests include symbolic and numerical multibody dynamics and optimisation, constrained optimal control, mainly in the field of vehicle dynamics with special focus on the development of intelligent systems for autonomous driving and assistance.

Kenta Seki received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Japan, in 2000 and 2002, and the Ph.D. degree in computer science and engineering from Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Japan, in 2009, respectively. From 2002 to 2006, he was with the Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Ibaraki, Japan. From 2006, he joined as a Research Associate the Project Research Laboratory on Motion Systems and Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Japan, where he is currently an Associate Professor with the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. His research interests are the design of hydraulic servo systems, dynamic testing, and the development of high speed and precision positioning mechanisms.

Tomoyuki Shimono received the B.E. degree in mechanical engineering from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, in 2004 and the M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in integrated design engineering from Keio University, Yokohama, Japan, in 2006 and 2007, respectively. From 2007 to 2008, he was a Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. From 2007 to 2008, he was also a Postdoctoral Fellow at Keio University. From 2008 to 2009, he was a Research Associate with the Global Centers of Excellence Program, Keio University. Since 2009, he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research interests include haptics, motion control, medical and rehabilitation robots, and actuators.

Brief description of the intended audience:

The intended audiences are students, researchers, and engineers (from both academia and industry) who are studying actuators, optimal control theory, vibration control, and haptics applied to medical and rehabilitation robots.
Expected knowledge for audience: Control theory, Nonlinear systems, Optimal control, and Motion control principles.

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T08

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Thanks to the increasing switching frequency of the conversion circuitry, size of the passive components such as transformer and filters has been shrunk, thus achieving higher power density. As a return, the relevant switching devices are subjected to higher switching losses and stresses. They can be abated by turning-on and/or -off the switches when the voltage across and/or the current through them is zero. Such a mechanism, collectively termed soft-switching, is known as zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) and zero-current-switching (ZCS) respectively. There are basically three families of soft-switching converters that differentiate for the circuital solutions. They are: 1) resonant-transition converters (RTCs), 2) quasi-resonant converters (QRCs) and multi-resonant converters (MRCs), and 3) resonant power converters (RPCs). RPCs are getting increasing interest nowadays due to their features of high-power density and high-efficiency, and will be the main issue of this tutorial.
The tutorial is divided into two parts. After framing the different soft-switching families, the first part will give a comprehensive overview on the RPCs. Their principle of operation is first introduced and then several RPC topologies with two- three- and four-elements (e.g. SRC, PRC, LCC, LLC and LCLC) are analyzed with regard to their performance such as input-output characteristics and efficiency. Moreover, the characteristics of each topology are discussed together with their merits and limitations.
The second part of the tutorial begins with the analysis of the main control techniques of the RPCs and of their effect on the RPC dynamics; it is followed by an overview on the impact of the technological progress in the power semiconductor devices on the performance of the RCs. The second part closes with design and implementation of RPCs for some study cases in the areas of power supply systems and renewable energy systems (e.g. photovoltaic, wind or fuel cells).

Biography of speaker:

Maria Teresa Outeiro (Member, IEEE) received the PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering with honors from the Faculty of Engineering of Porto University, Portugal in 2012. She is an Adjunct Professor at the Superior Institute of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, (ISEC/IPC), Portugal, and develops her research activities within the Research Center for Systems and Technologies at University of Porto, Portugal. Her scientific interests include soft-switching techniques, high-frequency power conversion for distribution generation, renewable energy sources (e.g. fuel cells and/or PV), current-fed topologies, integration of energy storage by batteries and super-capacitors. M.T: Outeiro has co-organized and co-chaired the special session “High-Performance Power Supplies” on the 39th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, and the special session “Power Supplies for Special Applications” on the 40th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society. She has publications in specialized Journals, is a reviewer and an Editorial Board member of International Scientific Journals, and a member of the Organizing Committee of International Conferences.

Giuseppe Buja (Life Fellow, IEEE) is a Full Professor at the University of Padova, Italy, where he holds classes on Electric Systems for Automation and Electric Road Vehicles. His scientific interests are power and industrial electronics, with applications to industry and vehicles. His current research issues are grid-connected converters for renewable sources, and wired/wireless charging systems for electric vehicles. He is a Life IEEE Fellow and has received the Dr. Mittelmann Achievement Award from IEEE Industrial Electronics Society “in recognition of his outstanding technical contributions to the field of industrial electronics”.
G. Buja has co-founded the IEEE International Symposium “Diagnostics of Electrical Machines, Power Electronics and Drives” and of the International Conference “Power Electronics and Motion Control”, and has chaired International Conferences and Committees, including the Annual Conference of the IEEE-IES (IECON). Presently, he is a Senior Member of the AdCom of the IEEE-IES, an Associate Editor of the “IEEE Transactions of Industrial Electronics”, and a member of a number of Scientific and/or Steering Committee of International Conferences.

Brief description of the intended audience:

The tutorial aims at providing the attendees with the capability of grasping the convenience of soft-switching device operation and the performance of RPCs. Attendees can be PhD students, researchers, and industry people interested in an easy-to-follow comprehension of the feature analysis of the RPCs, with an inclusive understanding of the potential advantages of the different RPC topologies in applicative contexts.

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T09

Brief Description of Tutorials:

As well know,sensors and actuators technologies have been well developed and contribute quality improvement in industrial fields. Their applications are strongly related to mass production and key technology of the control is position control. In recent interest, however, various kinds and various volumes product becomes more important request in industrial fields. To consider this request, force based system control must be a key technology.

  1. Sensorless Force Control and Its Applications
  2. Force Control in Industrial Applications
  3. Force Control in Haptics Applications
  4. Force Control in Mobile Systems
  5. Force Control in Medical and Rehabilitation Systems
Biography of speaker:

Toshiyuki Murakami received the B.E., M.E., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Keio University, Yokohama, Japan, in 1988, 1990, and 1993, respectively.
In 1993, he joined the Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, where he is currently a Professor in the Department of System Design Engineering. From 1999 to 2000, he was a Visiting Researcher with The Institute for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives, Aachen University of Technology, Aachen, Germany. His research interests include robotics, intelligent vehicles, mobile robots, and motion control.
Dr. Murakami is a member of IEEE IE Societies since 1993 and other societies (RAS). He is also a member of IEE of Japan and Robotics Society of Japan.

Kiyoshi Ohishi is a professor of Electrical Engineering Department at Nagaoka University of Technology in Japan from 2002. He received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Keio University, Yokohama, Japan, in 1981, 1983, and 1986, respectively. He was with Nagaoka University of Technology as an associate professor from 1993 to 2002.
His current research interests include motion control, robotics, mechatronics and power electronics. Now, he is an AdCom member of IEEE. Industrial Electronics Society. He is a member of Section and Chapter Committee of IEEE. Industrial Electronics Society. He is an associate Editor of Trans. on Industrial Electronics. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan, Society of Instrument and Control Engineers and Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Yasutaka Fujimoto was born in 1971 in Japan. He received B.E., M.E., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Japan, in 1993, 1995, and 1998, respectively. In 1998 he joined the Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, Yokohama, Japan as a research associate. Since 1999, he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Japan, where he is currently an associate professor.
His research interests include actuators, motion control, robotics, and manufacturing automation. Dr. Fujimoto is a member of IEEE IE Societies since 1993. He is also a member of IEE of Japan, Robotics Society of Japan, SICE, INFORMS, and IEICE.

Seiichiro Katsura received the B.E. degree in system design engineering and the M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in integrated design engineering from Keio University, Yokohama, Japan, in 2001, 2002 and 2004, respectively. From 2003 to 2005, he was a Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. From 2005 to 2008, he was with Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata, Japan. Since 2008, he has been with Keio University, Yokohama, Japan. His research interests include real-world haptics, human support space, systems energy conversion, electromechanical integration systems.
Prof. Katsura received the Best Paper Award from the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan in 2003, Dr. Yasujiro Niwa Outstanding Paper Award in 2004, and The 2008 European Power Electronics and Drives-Power Electronics and Motion Control Conference, EPE-PEMC'08 Best Paper Award in 2008.
He is a Member of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, IEEJ and Society of Instrumentation and Control Engineers.

Peter Xu joined the University of Auckland on 1 February 2011, as Chair in Mechatronics Engineering. He was the Professor of Mechatronics (2007-2010), Associate Professor (2005-2006) and Senior Lecturer (1999-2004) in School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, Massey University, New Zealand. Prior to coming to New Zealand, he worked at the City University of Hong Kong (1993-1998), the University of Stuttgart, Germany (1990-1992) and Southeast University, China (1988-1989).
His current research interests are mainly in areas of advanced mechatronics/robotics with applications in medicine and foods. He is Senior Member of IEEE and Fellow of IPENZ (Institution of Professional Engineers of New Zealand). He has served as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics (since 2003), was Associate Editor for IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine (2008-2009), and Editor for International Journal of Intelligent Systems Technologies and Applications, IJISTA (2005-2010).

Brief description of the intended audience:

Researchers and Engineers in Production Industry, Medical Equipment and Motion Control Fields

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T10

Brief Description of Tutorials:

During the last few years, the adoption of lithium ion batteries has become well established in mobile applications, as well as in stationary applications. In order to take full advantage of the superior performance characteristics of modern lithium ion batteries, advanced management is mandatory to ensure a safe and reliable operation of the battery and prolong its life. This tutorial aims at presenting current and future trends in the design of battery management systems (BMSs) for large-format lithium ion batteries, which consist of several series-connected elementary battery cells.
A primary function of a BMS is an accurate and fail-safe monitoring of the battery parameters. They include the voltage and temperature of each cell of the battery, as well as the battery current. For all these parameters, commercial solutions are available. Indeed, some of the integrated monitoring circuits on the market have already reached their 3rd or 4th generation and significant improvements have been made in measurement accuracy and communication robustness. However, competition on the market is growing and research in this field is ongoing. Important topics driven by the industry are safety functions and cost reduction (e.g., through reduced bill of materials for the monitoring circuit). Current research activities span from new monitoring architectures (such as cell integrated monitoring solutions using wireless or power line communication) to monitoring new parameters with online electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) or optical sensors.
The acquired battery parameters are used to maintain all the battery cells in their safe operating area (SOA), as well as to estimate their internal state. The latter include the State-of-Charge (SoC) and State-of-Health (SoH) state variables. Their precise knowledge is fundamental for evaluating the residual energy stored in the battery, its capability of providing power to the load, and for realizing battery diagnosis and prognostics functions. This tutorial will provide a brief overview of the most used approaches for cell modeling and for SoC estimation. Then, focus will be moved to SoH estimation, which is an open and challenging research topic. Speakers' most recent research results on this field will be discussed and applied to range estimation in electric vehicles in the framework of big data technology.

Biography of speaker:

Federico Baronti received the M.Sc. degree in Electronic Engineering in 2001 and the PhD in 2005 at the University of Pisa, Italy. Since 2011 he is an assistant professor at the same university. He works on the design of innovative systems aiming at improving the performance, safety and comfort of road vehicles. More recent activities concern Li-ion battery modeling and the development of innovative battery management systems. He co-authored more than 70 publications on international journals and conference proceedings and holds one Italian patent. He is the co-founder and vice-chair of the IEEE-IES technical committee on “Energy Storage”. He is associate editor of the IEEE Trans. on Industrial Informatics.

Mo-Yuen Chow (S'81, M'82, SM'93, F'07) earned his degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (B.S., 1982); and Cornell University (M. Eng., 1983; Ph.D., 1987). Dr. Chow joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University as an Assistant Professor in 1987, Associate Professor in 1993, and Professor since 1999. Dr. Chow is a Changjiang Scholar and a Visiting Professor at Zhejiang University. Dr. Chow is the founder and the director of the Advanced Diagnosis, Automation, and Control (ADAC) Laboratory at North Carolina State University. His current research focuses on cooperative distributed control and fault management with applications on smart grids, PHEVs, batteries, and mechatronics systems. Dr. Chow has published one book, several book chapters, and over two hundred journal and conference articles related to his research work. He is an IEEE Fellow, the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics 2010-2012, and has received the IEEE Region-3 Joseph M. Biedenbach Outstanding Engineering Educator Award, the IEEE ENCS Outstanding Engineering Educator Award, and the IEEE ENCS Service Award.

Martin Wenger has received his degree in Mechatronic Engineering (Dipl.-Ing.) from the Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in 2008. He then joined the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology (IISB) in Erlangen, where he was strongly involved in building up the Battery Systems Group as part of the institute's Power Electronics Division. As a research scientist he is responsible for the overall battery system design, especially for battery supplied electric vehicles (i.e., road vehicles, watercraft, aircraft, and spacecraft) and stationary electrical energy storage systems for renewable energies. His recent research work includes novel sensors and actuators for battery systems with focus on innovative distributed battery monitoring architectures.

Brief description of the intended audience:

The target audience of the proposed workshop includes graduate students, researchers and professional engineers interested in gaining an in-depth knowledge of current and future trends in the design of advanced battery management systems for lithium ion batteries, which is mandatory for an effective use of these batteries.
This tutorial will be beneficial for system engineers (in both academia and industry) working on, or interested in, battery system design and integration into electrified vehicles, as well as stationary applications.

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T11

Brief Description of Tutorials:

The world must solve important challenges to control and transform energy in an efficient way. Examples of this are in transportation, renewable energies and industrial processing applications. These problems can be solved using power converters based on modern power semiconductor devices. The ideal converter in many of these applications may have the following characteristics:

  • i) Sinusoidal input and output currents.
  • ii)  Operation with unity power factor.
  • iii)  Regeneration capability.
  • iv)  Compact design with a good power to weight ratio.

All these characteristics can be fulfilled by Matrix Converters and this is the reason for the tremendous interest in this topology. In the last decade many advances in the development of this topology have been presented, including industrial applications up to megawatt levels. The use of Matrix Converters in real applications and the challenges that these applications present is very topical and important. This tutorial will present to the power electronics community a review and the state-of-the-art of the most recent advances with topics such as:

  • - Matrix Converter basic principle of operation, commutation concepts, modulation and dimensioning.
  • - Matrix Converter derived topologies (multi-level, HF link, indirect, sparse, very sparse, ultra sparse, etc.).
  • - Practical examples of Matrix Converter demonstrators for aerospace, transportation, renewable energy and industrial applications as well as converters using new semiconductor device technology.
  • - New control/modulation methods for Matrix Converter applications, including SVM, DTC, Predictive Control.
    • - Existing and future applications of Matrix Converters in Industrial applications and associated hardware device and options for circuit constructions (given by a suitable industrialist - tba)
  • - Matrix Converter power quality, reliability and converter stability issues.
Biography of speaker:

Prof. Marco Rivera received his B.Sc. in Electronics Engineering and M.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the Universidad de Concepción, Chile in 2007 and 2008, respectively. He received the PhD degree at the Department of Electronics Engineering, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, in Valparaíso, Chile, in 2011 with a scholarship from the Chilean Research Fund CONICYT. During 2011 and 2012 he was working on a Post Doctoral position and as part-time professor of Digital Signal Processors and Industrial Electronics at Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María and currently he is a professor in Universidad de Talca, Chile. His research interests include matrix converters, predictive and digital controls for high power drives, four leg converters, renewable energies and development of high performance control platforms based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays.

Prof. Pat Wheeler received his BEng [Hons] degree in 1990 from the University of Bristol, UK. He received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering for his work on Matrix Converters from the University of Bristol, UK in 1994. In 1993 he moved to the University of Nottingham and worked as a research assistant in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. In 1996 he became a Lecturer in the Power Electronics, Machines and Control Group at the University of Nottingham, UK. Since January 2008 he has been a Full Professor in the same research group. He has published over 400 academic publications in leading international conferences and journals. Prof Pat Wheeler is Director of the University of Nottingham Institute for Aerospace Technology, Deputy Head of the Power Electronics, Machines and Controls Research Group and a IEEE Power Electronics Society Distinguished Lecturer. His research interests include Power Conversion for industrial, aerospace and energy applications.

Prof. Johann W. Kolar received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree from the University of Technology Vienna, Austria. Since 1984 he has been working as an independent international consultant in close collaboration with the University of Technology Vienna, in the fields of power electronics, industrial electronics and high performance drives. He has proposed numerous novel converter topologies and modulation/control concepts, e.g., the VIENNA Rectifier, the SWISS Rectifier, the Delta-Switch Rectifier, the isolated Y-Matrix AC/DC Converter and the three-phase AC-AC Sparse Matrix Converter. Dr. Kolar has published over 450 scientific papers at main international conferences, over 180 papers in international journals, and 2 book chapters. Furthermore, he has filed more than 110 patents. He was appointed Assoc. Professor and Head of the Power Electronic Systems Laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich on Feb. 1, 2001, and was promoted to the rank of Full Prof. in 2004. He has supervised over 50 Ph.D. students and PostDocs.

Prof. José Rodríguez received the Engineer degree in electrical engineering from the Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, in Valparaíso, Chile, in 1977 and the Dr.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany, in 1985. He has been with the Department of Electronics Engineering, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, since 1977, where he was full Professor and Rector. He has coauthored more than 350 journal and conference papers. His main research interests include multilevel inverters, new converter topologies, control of power converters, and adjustable-speed drives. Dr. Rodriguez is member of the Chilean Academy of Engineering and currently the Rector of Universidad Andrés Bello.

Brief description of the intended audience:

The intended audiences are any graduate student, academic and professional members of the power electronics community working in motor drives, electrical energy systems transportation, renewable energy and industrial processing applications.

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T13

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Condition monitoring is of high concern in industrial applications since it minimizes the downtime and improves the reliability, availability, safety and productivity of these systems. For electrical motors and generators, faults detection and diagnosis is usually performed by vibration monitoring, temperature measurements, oil monitoring, flux monitoring and current analysis. Among these various techniques, current analysis has several advantages since it is a noninvasive technique that avoids the use of extra sensors. Moreover, the electrical signals (for instance, the stator current) are usually available and inexpensive to measure.
Stator currents processing-based faults detection and diagnosis of electric machines and drives has received intense research interest for several decades. Moreover, the International Standard “ISO FDIS 20958” dealing with “Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machine systems - Electrical signature analysis of three-phase induction motors” sets out guidelines for the online techniques recommended for the purposes of condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines, based on electrical signature analysis. Hence, many studies have shown that fault monitoring could be performed by supervising the current spectrum. Most of the used faults detection and diagnosis techniques perform spectral analysis, such as Fourier or MUSIC techniques. Although these techniques exhibit good results in stationary conditions, they are not well suited for a majority of electric machines and drives applications. Indeed, these applications environment is predominantly non-stationary due to transients or variable speed operations. In this context, the involved signals are usually non-stationary, embedded in noise, and can contain closely spaced frequencies. It is then obvious that faults detection and diagnosis in such applications are challenging tasks that need using specific signal processing tools.
In this challenging context, this tutorial aims to present the main advanced signal processing techniques for electromechanical systems condition monitoring (faults detection and diagnosis). It will focus on presenting these advanced tools from time-frequency representation and time-scale analysis to demodulation techniques. All these techniques will be evaluated and compared and their advantages and drawbacks highlighted. Afterward, it will be introduced the parametric spectral analysis, which aims to handle some of the main raised drawbacks.

Biography of speaker:

Mohamed El Hachemi Benbouzid (S'92–M'95–SM'98) was born in Batna, Algeria, in 1968. He received the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Batna, Batna, Algeria, in 1990, the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from the National Polytechnic Institute of Grenoble, Grenoble, France, in 1991 and 1994, respectively, and the Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches degree from the University of Picardie “Jules Verne,” Amiens, France, in 2000.
After receiving the Ph.D. degree, he joined the Professional Institute of Amiens, University of Picardie “Jules Verne,” where he was an Associate Professor of electrical and computer engineering. In September 2004, he joined the University Institute of Technology (IUT) of Brest, University of Brest, Brest, France, as a Professor of electrical engineering. His main research interests and experience include analysis, design, and control of electric machines, variable-speed drives for traction, propulsion, and renewable energy applications, and fault diagnosis of electric machines.
Prof. Benbouzid is an IEEE Senior Member. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal on Energy Conversion. He is also an Associate Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, and the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY. He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE/ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS from 2006 to 2009.

Brief description of the intended audience:

This tutorial should be interesting to IES member and in particular to IECON attendees as it is dealing with a topical problem. Indeed, the faults detection and diagnosis topic is the keyword of three proposed special sessions (SS13, SS15, and SS42). In this context, this tutorial could be useful for these special session attendees to briefly acquire backgrounds of signal processing for condition monitoring not only of electric machines and drives but also in smart grids.

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T14

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Multilevel converters have become a mature alternative in the area of high-power medium-voltage applications (renewable energy conversion, conveyors, motor drives, power distribution systems, transportation). Voltage operation above classic semiconductor limits and near sinusoidal outputs with low harmonic distortion are some of the characteristics that have made these power converters popular for academia and industry. In this tutorial, most common knowledge and recent multilevel converter research will be included, specifically in the areas of multilevel converters topologies, modeling, modulation and control.
This tutorial presents the most widespread topologies like the Neutral Point Clamped, Flying Capacitor, and Cascaded H-bridge inverters. Other recent topologies like hybrid and modular multilevel converters are also covered.
Special attention is devoted to the most relevant control and modulation methods developed for multilevel inverters: multilevel sinusoidal Pulsewidth modulation, Space Vector Modulation, Hybrid modulation and multilevel Harmonic Control. Grid connected application is a hot topic and is addressed including multilevel converters modeling, current and power controllers, synchronization methods and dc voltage balancing strategies.

Biography of speaker:

Leopoldo G. Franquelo (M'84–SM'96–F'05), received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Seville (US), Seville, Spain, in 1977 and 1980, respectively.
He is currently with the Department of Electronics Engineering, US. His current research interests include modulation techniques for multilevel inverters and applications to power electronic systems for renewable energy systems.
Dr. Franquelo has been a Distinguished Lecturer since 2006, an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS since 2007, and Co-Editor-in-Chief since 2014. He was a Member-at-Large of the IES AdCom (2002–2003), the Vice President for Conferences (2004–2007), and the President Elect of the IES (2008–2009). He was the President of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society (2010–2011) and was a recipient (as coauthor) of the 2008 Best Paper Award of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Magazine and the 2012 Best Paper Award of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS. He was the recipient of the 2012 IEEE Industrial Electronics Society Eugene Mittelmann Achievement Award and is currently serving as Co-EiC of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS.

Sergio Vazquez (S'04–M'08-SM'14) was born in Seville, Spain, in 1974. He received the B.S, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in industrial engineering from the University of Seville (US), Seville, in 2003, 2006, and 2010, respectively.
In 2002, he was with the Power Electronics Group, US, working on R&D projects. He is currently an Associate Professor with the Department of Electronic Engineering, US. His research interests include power electronics systems and the modeling, modulation, and control of power electronics converters applied to renewable energy technologies.
Dr. Vazquez was a recipient (as coauthor) of the 2012 Best Paper Award of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS.

Brief description of the intended audience:

• Audience for this tutorial are mainly:

  • - Undergraduate and postgraduate students in the field of power electronics
  • - Practicing engineers and researchers that want to update or refresh their knowledge on multilevel converters
  • - Experts in the field of multilevel converters

• The audience should have basic knowledge about:

  • - Power electronics basics
  • - Modulation and converter control concepts

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T15

Brief Description of Tutorials:

Effective and efficient services in healthcare have been facing challenging issues. At this point, there are 83 countries not fulfilling the threshold requirement of 23 skilled health professionals per 10,000 people. Based on the survey deducted by the World Health Organization (WHO), the world will fall short of healthcare workers by 12.9 million by the year 2035. biomedical technologies and applications need to be developed.

The advanced development of biomedical application is favourable to the nonconvex optimization techniques, in particular for wireless systems. In this tutorial, a few of our recent developments will be discussed. These include the detection of viral infections and bacterial infections based on cough sounds, the classification of supraventricular tachycardias and ventricular tachycardias based on electrocardiograms, …etc. In the most updated development, wearable devices are employed for the acquisitions of the electrocardiograms, the electromyograms and the blood glucose concentrations. These biomedical signals are sent to cell phones via wireless technologies. This can reduce the hardware implementation costs. On the other hand, the cough sounds are directly recorded through mobile audio microphones. Next, nonconvex optimization techniques are employed to perform the detections and the recognitions of various biomedical applications in the cell phones. Finally, the detection and the recognition results are displayed on the cell phones via graphical interface based mobile applications.

In this tutorial, an overview of the trends and techniques for biomedical Industrial applications will be discussed. The ICT infrastructure and the useful and popular algorithms for medical identification of various key diseases will also be briefed. In particular, special undated applications will be briefed. For instance, the detection of viral infections and bacterial infections based on cough sounds, the classification of supraventricular tachycardias and ventricular tachycardias based on electrocardiograms, the detection of Parkinson's diseases based on electromyograms …. etc are formulated as biomedical signal recognition problems. To perform the biomedical signal recognitions, some nonconvex optimization techniques are developed. First, instead of transforming signals in the time domain to the frequency domain via the conventional energy preserved matrices such as the discrete Fourier transform matrix and the discrete cosine transform matrix, general energy preserved transforms based on Hermitian matrices are employed. The features for performing the biomedical signal recognitions are chosen as the products of the transform coefficients and the mask coefficients. Here, the join design of the transform matrix and the mask coefficients are formulated as a quadratic matrix equality constrained optimization problem. To reduce the total number of features, the interclass separations are maximized and the intraclass separations are minimized. To yield high recognition rates, the perceptrons with the activation functions having multi-piece domains and multi-levels are employed. The design of the boundaries of the multi-piece domains is formulated as a sparse optimization problem. In fact, all these optimization problems are nonconvex. Analytical solutions of these nonconvex optimization problems are derived so that solutions of these optimization problems can be found in real time. Some computer numerical simulation results are demonstrated.

Biography of speaker:

Prof. Wing-Kuen Ling received the B. Eng. (Hons) and M. Phil. degrees from the department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, in 1997 and 2000, respectively, and the Ph. D. degree in the department of Electronic and Information Engineering from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 2003. In 2004, he joined the King's College London as a Lecturer. In 2010, he joined the University of Lincoln as a Principal Lecturer and promoted to a Reader in 2011. In 2012, he joined the Guangdong University of Technology as a Full Professor. He is a Fellow of IET, a senior member of IEEE, a China National Young Thousand-People-Plan Distinguished Professor and a University Hundred-People-Plan Distinguished Professor. He was awarded the best reviewer prize from the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society in 2008 and 2012, the best paper award in session of the IECON 2013, the ICCE-C 2014 and the ICCE-C 2015 as well as the merit paper award and the best paper award for the whole conference of the ICCE-C 2014 and ICCE-C 2015, respectively. He serves in the cloud and wireless systems for industrial applications technical committee, the industrial informatics technical committee and the industrial agents technical committee of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society, the nonlinear circuits and systems technical committee, the digital signal processing technical committee and the power and energy circuits and systems technical committee of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society, as well as the Pearl River Delta Development Committee Member of the IET and the treasurer of the Special User Group of the Internet of Things Hong Kong. He has also served as the guest editor-in-chief of several highly rated international journals, such as the Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing (CSSP), the American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences (AJEAS), the International Journal of Digital Content Technology and Its Applications (IJDCTIA), the Mediterranean Journal of Electronics and Communications (MJEC), the Numerical Algebra, Control and Optimization (NACO), and the IET Signal Processing (IET SP). He is currently an associate editor of the International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos (IJBC), the Circuits, Systems and Signal Processing, (CSSP), the Journal of the Franklin Institute (JFI), the International Journal of Computer Programming (IJCP), the International Journal of Engineering and Emerging Technologies (IJEET), the International Journal of Applied Mathematics and Modeling (IJAMM) and the Open Journal Advanced Engineering Techniques (OJAET). He has served as an associate editor of the American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences (AJEAS) and a guest associate editor of the International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos (IJBC). He research interests include time frequency analysis, optimization, nonlinear digital signal processing systems and control theory for biomedical and multimedia applications. He has published an undergraduate textbook, a research monograph, four book chapters, a book review published in an IEEE journal, 93 internationally leading journal papers and 81 highly rated international conference papers. He has got 3 patent pending, held 9 visiting positions and delivered 42 seminars in the above fields.

Dr Kim-Fung Tsang obtained his PhD degree from the Cardiff University of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom. He has close ties with industry, and is working actively on RFID (ZigBee) for numerous applications, including energy management system for utilities, metering infrastructure, security, and office/home automation. Dr Tsang has published more than 150 technical papers. He was the recipient of CityU's Applied Research Excellence Award, the first Hong Kong Science & Product Innovation Competition and the World Chinese Invention Exposition. The other accolades won by Dr Tsang include the EDN Asia Innovator Award, Ericsson's Super-Wireless Application Award, the Best Award from Freescale Semiconductor, the Innovation China Outstanding Entrepreneur Award and the Excellent Product Award from the China Hi-Tech Fair. KF is the Associate Editor and the Guest Editor of IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics, the Chairman of Technical Committee “Wireless and Cloud Architecture For Industrial Applications” of the Industrial Electronics Society, the Editor of KSII Transactions on Internet and Information Systems, as well as the Chairman of the Internet of Things Special Users Group Hong Kong (IoT SUG HK).

KF is a Fellow of HKIE, Senior Member of IEEE and is now an Associate Professor as well as the Director of Wireless Sustainability Center in the Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong.

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Tutorial Chairs